Wednesday, October 5, 2011

Yeh hai meri kahani


I ogled at the baby placed in my hands. His round-black-innocent eyes, dusky coloured skin, curly jet-black hair, rosy pink lips curled one on top of the other reminded me of the rhyme I learnt when I was a year or two older than this baby. He looked at me with an intense stare and his lips curved to form a smile, which I knew would remind me in the worst of worst moments that it would be ok. I held him tight and kept my little finger in his tiny hands, and closed my eyes and said promised, “chahe kuch bhi ho jaaye mein yeh haath nahi chodunga.”  

Three years had passed since Rahul was placed in my hands. But I never had a moment where I did not keep my promise. Be it day or the worst nights, I always had him by my side, reminding me with that beautiful smile of his that it would be ok. Probably he wouldn’t calm me with the same smile once he grew up and realized what his mother did for a living, but I hope he would understand.

I was a graduate student. I completed my graduation in a very reputed college next to my village. I was a bright and ambitious student, may be if I wasn’t I wouldn’t have had this fate. A man came home, one day, and asked my mother, “kya aap apni neti ko kaam ke silsile mein Mumbai bechna chaathi ho?” My eyes would have nearly pumped out of my face, but thankfully they didn’t. My mother, unlike the others in the village, did not believe in getting her daughter married right after her studies. She wanted her daughter to work and earn money, before she could get her married off. Maybe if she followed the other women in the village, I would have been in some safe home, making dal and paratha.

I was called off from my past with a loud knock on my door. I opened it to a man in his early 40’s, who was drunk and barely in his senses.

Man: “Jaldi karo, mujhe zyada waqy nahi hai.

"Kya aap shadi shuda ho?”

Man: “Haan. lekin use teri kya lena dena? jaldi karo varna mein kissi aur ka paas ka ja ongi. Bahut paise denge. Aa ja randi.

With a sigh, knowing someday I would be the cause for the loss of his marriage, I agreed. Only to feed Rahul.

Sheela was a prostitute, by fate. The man who had taken her to Mumbai, was part of a sex racket, and had brought her over to sell her. She had no other go but to continue with her profession, since she had no other option to feed her son, Rahul. There are thousands and millions of Sheela's out there, and it is high time that they got the respect they deserved. They are in this profession because they have no other alternative. Provide them with one, and I am sure they would be more than happy and grateful to do a wonderful job out of it.

All characters in this story are of my creation. I had no intentions of narrating anyone's story or life. Any coincidence is purely fictitious.
Photo courtesy: Google

16 comments:

Saru Singhal said...

Life gives no options to few people. Call it fate or whatever...Great post, one of the best till date...:)
Saru

Red Handed said...

Just soo sad but realistic. So many innocent women are victims of trafficing!!
Glad that you wrote this.

The life-a-holic said...

@Saru Di: Thank you so very much. Truly honoured!!

@Red Handed: I always find life to be partial in many ways. While it pours out all its joys, luxuries and happiness to a lot, it pours in almost nothing to another set! I wonder why so!! Thank you :)

PeeVee said...

We talk of rehab for these women but what kinda life do they have after leaving behind this? What man will accept them for who they are, what society will welcome them if they know the truth? To me, that's saddest part. They have no chance at life, at all.

P.S: Nice header:) More changes?

The life-a-holic said...

@Dinkz: Completely true. To be honest, all of us out here would talk about it being a sad reality in life and stuff, but how many would actually accept them to enter our house, if required? And I question myself also.
Thank you. Planning on what to do next :P

WonderWall said...

Life is an epic drama.... I wish humans stop being so cruel just for the sake of money...

The life-a-holic said...

@WonderWall: Life is a very weird, unpredictable drama. It makes us do things we never thought we would do. But I guess that is how life is. We just have to move on. This way or the other.

TheGirlAtFirstAvenue said...

There are lot of NGO's where people like her get a second chance at all. It looks impossible, it feels like their life is not worth anything, it feels like they can never get over it and move on, but they can! I have read so many true stories about girls who were rescued, educated, taught few skills and are now comfortably working in cottage industries and other small jobs like volunteering and teaching and leading a perfectly normal life.

I agree with what you wrote.. if you show them that there is another way and guide them, they'll definitely have a better chance at a better life.

The life-a-holic said...

@TheGirlAtFirstAvenue: Thank you. And yes, there are several NGO's on the go to improving their life. And the stories of girls who have been rescued from these intolerable life, are a boost to the other 'many'!!!

Sujatha Sathya said...

it is so sad
moving post Deepthi

The life-a-holic said...

@Sujatha Di: Indeed a very sad story.

Rahul said...

A moving post!

Upasana said...

My first visit here.Firstly, i love your blog name.It intrigued me and thats how i got here.

I loved the post.Its such a harsh reality.Very sad.

http://myblawghh.blogspot.com

The life-a-holic said...

@Rahul: Thank you very much

@Upasana: Welcome :)!! Thank you so much for your comment on the post and my blog name. Was planning of changing it, but I guess I should not :P!

Saru Singhal said...

Not able to post comment on your recent post...Please check !

The life-a-holic said...

I hope you can now!!